Selected Families and Individuals

Notes


Robert Stone DUKE

1.  Robert was made Bishop in the Heber East Ward and held that office about fifteen years, then was ordained a Patriarch for the Wasatch Stake.


Anna Ross YOUNG

1.  Anna reported that she had worked in the LDS church to the best of her ability and was a member of the Stake Relief Society for thirty years.


John DUKE

1.  Kenneth LeRoy Wagner wrote the following:

    John Duke ws a young boy in 1840 when his folks joind The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.  His father, a brick mason, had to work along the way.  John and Robert, his brother, helped with the work.  While they were in Nauvoo, their father was called on a mission to Delaware.  During his absence the Prophet Joseph Smith was killed.  John and Robert were down by the Mississippi River when to their amazement the stream appeared to be turning to blood.  Shortly afterward a neighbor came along and informed them of the death of the Prophet.
    His father and mother were sick and were forced to remain in Nauvoo when the Saints were driven out.  The mob came and told them they had to leave.  The family talked to the mob and told them of the danger it would be to move them, but the mobsters replied,  "That is good enough for a Mormon".
     However, the Lord was with the Duke family and a siser Jones and her son, William, helped them move to Benton Fort where they pitched their tents and lived for about a year.
     John was left at home several times to care for the family while his father and older bvrothers were away working.  In the Spring of 1850 the family started for Utah in the Bennett Company and arrived in Salt Lake City on 22 Sep 1850.
    In September 1851 they moved to Provo, Utah, where John's father and brother owned a brick kiln.  There he met and married Martha Vance Young.  Soon after his marriage John was called by Brigham Young to meet the saints who were enroute to Utah.  He was also one of the Pony Express Riders from Salt Lake City to Missouri.
    John and his brother built a brick kiln near the historical place just north of Heber City which was called "London" and he moved his family to Heber City to be near his work.  At one time John and  his brother Robert carried a plow from Provo to Heber City, walking all the way, a distance of 26 miles.
    He was called "Uncle Johnny Duke" by the whole community.  John Duke personally knew the Prophet Joseph Smith from whom he received a blessing and a prediction that he would be a healer in Zion.  He sat on the Prophet's knee and Joseph Smith placed his hand on John's head when he was sever years old.


Sarah Jane DUKE

1.  Sarah Jane died unmarried.


Lewis Adolphia DUKE

1.  Lewis died unmarried.


Brigham Lawrence YOUNG

1.  He was not related to the great Mormon leader and prophet, Brigham Young, but he did receive his first name from that man.  His parents were residing in Nauvoo, Illinois, at the time of the martyrdom of the Prophet Joseph Smith and following that event a controversy arose over the successor to leadership of the LDS Church.   A meeting was held to determine the course they should take.  Although they had received the instruction from the Prophet Joseph Smith that the president of the twelve apostles should become the leader of the Church each time the president's seat was vacated, many thought of other plans and possibilities.  As is the policy, matters of discord are openly discussed and voted upon by the people.  The meeting was called to discuss this important decision.  During the course of the meeting Brigham Young arose to give his views and to the astonishment of the audience the "Mantle of Joseph fell upon Brigham".    That meant that to the thousands of Saints assembled Brigham Young had the appearance of Joseph Smith and spoke in his voice, every aspect of his appearance became that of Joseph Smith.

    Rhoda was a witness of this manifestation and was so impressed that she never for a moment doubted the divine calling of Brigham Young's leadership.  She was so impressed by the incident that five years later, when she was again presented with a man child she gave him the name of the Prophet Brigham Young.

    Brigham Lawrence Young was the only male member of the household of Rhoda Byrne Jared Young to survive the trek and the early persecutions of the Mormon community.  He was four years old when he entered Salt Lake Valley with his mother and five sisters.  He could remember taking willows and brushing crickets into the irrigation ditches when those pests invaded the crops of the Utah proneers and how relieved he was to realize the help of the seagulls that came from the island of Great Salt Lake to devour the crickets and save their food.

    The only memory he had of his father, Adolphia, was when his brother Samuel held him by the hand to look down into the grave that held no coffin, just the beloved figure of their father wrapped in quilts and his mother's beaufiful hand made "coverlid".   Two days later Samuel was buried beside the road too, a victim of the same dread disease of Cholera.

    "Brig" received his education in the pioneer schools of Provo, Utah, and finished the 7th grade, which was equal to a high school Junion class today.  He attended the Brigham Young Academy under Karl G. Maeser, famous pioneer teacher and founder of the school that later became the Brigham Young University.   His education was cut short when the family moved to the Muddy to colonize and raise cotton at the time of the Civil War.  He always regretted that he was unable to received his college degree.  

    "Brig" moved with his parents to Kanab, Utah in 1871 when he was twenty-two years old.  The following Spring he was engaged by Major J. W. Powell to participate in the Government Survey of the Grand Canyon, Kaibab Plateau, and Southern Utah tributaries of the Colorado River.  The pencil-man or map maker of the survey company soon noticed the natural talent Brigham possessed for drawing and would get him to help draw the maps, after the evening meal was finished.  He had hired out to the survey crew as cook, but in a short time was made one of the crew of pencil men.  Maps that the crew made are still available in the Library of Congress and were used in recent years to plat the plans for Glen Canyon Dam.  When the preliminary work was being mapped on the present construction for that dam and meetings were held in Kanab to determine the feelings of the citizens, one of the officials told the community that the maps made by B. L. Young on the Powell Survey proved the most beneficial of any they had used in construction plans.

    He and Frederick S. Dellenbaugh of the Powell Survey were sent to scout the "New Valley of Wonder", now Zions National Park, and he was the first to write a description of that place.  He was also a member of the Powell Survey Crew which made the first maps of Yellowstone Park in Wyoming.

    He participated in serveral Indian encounters and it was said of him that he was always able to talk the Indians out of actual hostilities.  He was Postmaster at Kanab, Utah for sixteen years and served two terms as mayor of the town.  He also served as a guide to parties withing to visit the surrounding hills and forests.

    When he became feeble, he was only able to walk three blocks to the post office to get his daily paper.  He would sit and rest on the post office window, set and read the news, then totter over to the drugstore where all the town loafers gathered to hear his and Uncle "Billy Mack" argue current events.  They both took the same paper and each read it with his own interpretation, as people do their Bibles.  Then they argued long and loudly and highly entertained the crowd until dinner time and only his life-long habit of punctuality to meals, which his wife served without five minutes variation, could tear him away and close the arguments.

    One night in February 1924, he became ill, not seriously it seemed, but he would allow nothing done for him.  He said, "I will be dead at noon tomorrow".  Some of the family suppressed a smile at his determination in such a circumstance, but the next day, just before noon, he bid farewell to the family surrounding his bed.  He turned his eyes toward his wife and said, "Ma has been might good to me".  At noon he was gone.   The Doctor said it was the easiest death he had ever witnessed.


Howard Brigham YOUNG

1.  Howard never married


Joseph Smith STRONG

1.  Immigration 24 Oct 1855, Utah


Malinda STRONG

1.  Matilda was TWIN to Martha


Jared Lewis YOUNG

1.  Never married


Mark YOUNG

1.  Mark was TWIN to Martha


Alfred Douglas YOUNG

1.  The first Mormon sermon he heard was preached by Elder John McIntosh by whom he was baptized in Jul 1841 in Gibson, Tennessee.  In February 1842 he and his brother William went to Jackson County, Tennessee on a visit to their parents, and there preached and baptized fifteen or twenty persons.  He moved to Nauvoo in 1842 and was ordained by President Joseph Young into the 10th Quorum of Seventies.  He was on a mission in the Southern States when the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum were martyred.  He came to the Great Salt Lake Valley in 1848 and settled in Big Cottonwood with his family.  In the Spring of 1854 he moved to Provo, where he lived until the Fall of 1868, and served as a member of the City Council for some years.  He was ordained senior President of the 52nd Quorum of Seventy by President Joseph Young on May 21, 1857.  In the Fall of '68 he was called to the Muddy Mission.  In 1871 he went to Kanab where he continued to dwell until his death.  He donated liberally to public improvements and helped toward the erection of three temples.

2.    He was a man of great faith and experienced many manifestations of the power of God, to which he bore a faithful testimony to the end of his life.


Alfred Douglas YOUNG

1.  The first Mormon sermon he heard was preached by Elder John McIntosh by whom he was baptized in Jul 1841 in Gibson, Tennessee.  In February 1842 he and his brother William went to Jackson County, Tennessee on a visit to their parents, and there preached and baptized fifteen or twenty persons.  He moved to Nauvoo in 1842 and was ordained by President Joseph Young into the 10th Quorum of Seventies.  He was on a mission in the Southern States when the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum were martyred.  He came to the Great Salt Lake Valley in 1848 and settled in Big Cottonwood with his family.  In the Spring of 1854 he moved to Provo, where he lived until the Fall of 1868, and served as a member of the City Council for some years.  He was ordained senior President of the 52nd Quorum of Seventy by President Joseph Young on May 21, 1857.  In the Fall of '68 he was called to the Muddy Mission.  In 1871 he went to Kanab where he continued to dwell until his death.  He donated liberally to public improvements and helped toward the erection of three temples.

2.    He was a man of great faith and experienced many manifestations of the power of God, to which he bore a faithful testimony to the end of his life.